Australian's love for air travel

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On average 13 million passengers use airlines to travel in Australia per month. 9 to 10 million trips are domestic and 3 to 4 million trips are international. These totals have increased by 32% since 2009 and this trend doesn't look like it's going to stop any time soon.

Latest data published from BITRE, 14 127 744 trips were recorded for travel in, out or within Australia for the month of January 2019.

As Aussies, we love to travel and the stats don't lie. When we compare our population vs the number of passengers flying, on average we jump on the plane 6.48 times a year; that's over 3 return trips for the average Australian.

When you compare this with the US, they track at 3.1 trips a year or our fellows from the UK manage to fly about 4.3 trips a year. We must love the airline food or the fighting for who gets the middle armrest in Economy.

When we do get to the airport, we notice bigger crowds in July, October or December as these are the most busiest months of the year. This sounds about right as we can hear children screaming as school holidays begin. The quietest month of the year is February. This coincides when the kids are back in school.

At an airport level, here is the top 10 Australian airports by passenger numbers, for the year ending January 2019:

Rank # Airport Passenger Count
1 Sydney 44 494 278
2 Melbourne 36 983 314
3 Brisbane 23 503 832
4 Perth 12 474 355
5 Adelaide 8 336 280
6 Gold Coast 6 474 572
7 Cairns 4 930 133
8 Canberra 3 248 765
9 Hobart 2 688 250
10 Darwin 1 959 026
What I found interesting:
  • Alice Springs (619 311) is a more popular destination than Ballina (537 981) or Rockhampton (552 108)
  • Launceston (1 384 288) is a more popular destination than the Sunshine Coast (1 232 601) or Newcastle (1 258 912)
  • Cairns is a more popular destination than Canberra or Hobart. What's wrong with Canberra or Hobart?

What about routes? What's the top 10 air routes in Australia? The below covers the year ending up to December 2018:

Rank # Route Passenger Count
1 Melbourne - Sydney 9 250 917
2 Brisbane - Sydney 4 825 718
3 Brisbane - Melbourne 3 569 218
4 Gold Coast - Sydney 2 722 796
5 Adelaide - Melbourne 2 498 317
6 Melbourne - Perth 2 113 233
7 Gold Coast - Melbourne 2 064 179
8 Adelaide - Sydney 1 906 542
9 Perth - Sydney 1 716 911
10 Hobart - Melbourne 1 652 803
What I found interesting:
  • Melbourne-Sydney route had 4892 recorded flights for January 2019 (that's 157 flights a day!), the next closest was Brisbane-Sydney had 2713 recorded flights for the same month or 87 flights a day
  • Highest load factor route of the top 10 was: Gold Coast-Melbourne at 87.6%. Hello airlines, more flights please!
  • Lowest load factor route of the top 10 was: Hobart-Melbourne at 79.2%. Higher chance of a spare seat on your next flight?
  • Perth-Sydney was the only top 10 route with under 10 000 recorded flights for the year: 9085 total or 25 flights a day
  • Brisbane-Perth didn't make the cut. (Rank 15 - 956 828)

What about international routes? What's the top 10 air routes? The below covers for the year ended January 2019:

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Rank # Route Passenger Count
1 Singapore - Melbourne 1 573 943
2 Auckland - Sydney 1 569 064
3 Singapore - Sydney 1 513 765
4 Auckland - Melbourne 1 256 664
5 Hong Kong - Sydney 1 160 554
6 Singapore - Perth 1 122 013
7 Auckland - Brisbane 945 219
8 Denpasar - Perth 889 219
9 Singapore - Brisbane 863 357
10 Los Angeles - Sydney 862 805
What I found interesting:
  • Singapore-Melbourne beats Auckland-Sydney for the first time
  • Perth bogans love Bali more than any other Australian city
  • Singapore is the #1 air freight destination by uplift/discharge volume, followed by Hong Kong and Auckland
  • New Zealand is the #1 foreign country by passenger uplift/discharge volume, followed by Singapore and UAE
  • Qantas, Jetstar and Virgin Australia have a 32.2% of the Australian international passenger market. The rest is operated by foreign carriers.

What does the future hold?

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We are going to see huge changes to Australia's aviation industry in the coming years:

Confirmed:

Additional runway in Brisbane:

Set to complete by 2020, the new runway opens up more capacity for Brisbane to bring in more visitors. BNE Airport Corporation expects to see 50 million trips by 2035. BNE air traffic control will love this.

Western Sydney International (Nancy Bird Walton) Airport (SWZ):

Set to open by 2026, the single runway airport aims to cater for domestic, international and cargo services from day one. The government expects this project will facilitate up to 10 million passengers a year by 2031. The airport has the space to build an additional runway when there is demand. The big players Qantas, Jetstar, Virgin Australia and Tiger have voiced their commitment to operating at the new airport. Finally, we can get to Sydney without worrying about curfews.

Speculation:

How Long is a piece of string Haul flights:

2 hours on a bus is already long enough, but 17 hours or 14498km from Perth to London has proven to be a successful route stated by Qantas. A lot of speculation is in the air about Perth-Paris or Sydney-London in the near future. But let's be clear, longer flights is predicted to be reality in the near future.

International flights from Hobart:

An agreement has been signed by Federal government to fund the Hobart City Deal in February 2019. Even though there is an agreement, no airlines have confirmed their intention to operate internationally from Hobart yet. If we hear more, we'll let you know.

*Source from Australia's Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, US Bureau of Transportation Statistics and UK Department of Transport.

**Gifs is not owned by Ausflyer and sourced from ChooseBrisbane.com.au and Giphy.com

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Posted by Sonny